April

Home Up April 2006 Fireballs

 

2007

The following colorgramme shows the radio meteor counts for the month of April 2007. The horizontal axis shows the date and the vertical axis the local time (UT).

The Lyrids are responsible for the indistinct peak between the 22nd and 23rd April. You can read my Lyrid shower analysis here.

Detection is operating on 55.25MHz, using a three element Yagi, bearing 180 deg ETN and 10 degree elevation.

2006

The following colorgramme shows the radio meteor counts for the month of April 2006. The horizontal axis shows the date and the vertical axis the local time (UT).

The Lyrids appear to peak between the 22nd and 23rd April.

Detection is operating on 55.25MHz, using a three element Yagi, bearing 180 deg ETN and 10 degree elevation.

2005

The following colorgramme shows the radio meteor counts for the month of April 2005. The horizontal axis shows the date and the vertical axis the local time (UT).

The Lyrid meteor shower is seen to peak on the morning of 22nd April 2005, producing a distinct double-hump signature. The dip in the double-hump occurs when the radiant aligns with the transmit receive path (see geometrical effectiveness). The source of the Lyrid meteor shower is Comet Thatcher (C/1861 G1). Every year in April the Earth ploughs through Thatcher's dusty debris stream with a relative velocity of 49 km/s. 

The results were affected by sporadic E on the 28th April. These results have been removed leaving the blank space.

Detection is operating on 55.25MHz, using a three element Yagi, bearing 180 deg ETN and 10 degree elevation.

2003

The following colorgramme shows the radio meteor counts for the month of April 2003. The horizontal axis shows the date and the vertical axis the local time (UT).

 

The results from the some early parts of the month showed very high counts. These were most likely due to non-meteoric propagation modes and have been removed, leaving black spaces. The peak of activity appears to occur on the 22nd April and may be attributed to the Lyrid shower.